CHESSBOOK REVIEWS


Latest book reviews of  May  2018
BOOKS REVIEWS BY JOHN ELBURG.

Wilhelminalaan 33 

7261 BP RUURLO 

The Netherlands.
John Elburg





                                                                                                          Chess Books


How to Beat the Open Games by Sverre Johnsen
2018
Gambit Publications Ltd
http://www.gambitbooks.com
E-mail info@gambitbooks.com
253 pages

Price £18.99
ISBN 978-1-911465-23-2




The well known chess analyst Sverre Johnsen from Norway provides the reader with a impressive made full move to move made repertoire book based on the
black lines of the Italian game,and dear reader Sverre Johnsen goes much further than covering only the slow Italian!
As we all know at top level chess the Ruy Lopez is out and the Italian game is in!
The reader will find smashing lines on the Two Knights Defence, Giuoco Piano, Four Knights and Scotch and various other open Games as the King’s Gambit, Göring, Danish,Center Game and so on.
One of my favourites in this book is chapter ten,Evans Gambit and the memorable game:
Fiorito,Mario V - Krantz,Kjell Erik
Evans Gambit Thematic corr, 1988
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Bd6 6.d4 Nf6 7.dxe5 Bxe5 8.Ng5 d5 9.exd5 Na5 10.Qa4+ c6 11.dxc6 0-0 12.Ba3 Nxc4 13.Qxc4 b5 14.Qb3 b4 15.Bxb4 Rb8 16.Qc4 Rxb4 17.Qxb4 Qd3 0-1.
Sverre Johnsen writes after move 5…Bd6!? In 1988 computers didn’t play any important role in correspondence chess,but as a matter of fact most current analyses engines quite like this bishop retreat.
And I can insure you the black player from Sweden Kjell Krantz never used a computer to play correspondence chess!
Kjell Krants did a lot of research on the Evans Gambit but his studies never saw any printed paper.
Mario Fiorito passed  away not very long after this game,the extensive tension of correspondence chess was to much for his chess devoted  heart.
A interesting suggestion on move two from Sverre Johnsen is 1.e4 e5 2.Be2 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f4 exf4 5.Nf3 now we reach a kind of King’s Gambit where white’s light squared bishop is slightly passively placed but black has lost the option of play …g5.
Conclusion: Important reference work on the Open Games!


British Chess Literature to 1914: A Handbook for Historians by Tim Harding
2018
McFarland & Company,Inc.,Publishers Box 611
Jefferson,North Carolina 28640.
http://www.mcfarlandpub.com
393 pages
Price $49.95

ISBN: 978-1-4766-6839-0



Seldom a chess book has impressed so much as this latest work from Tim Harding on British chess literature and chess columns, the first Scottish chess column began in 1847,the first in Ireland in the 1860s,and the earliest in Wales in 1870.
Uncountable in this are Tim Harding’s research discoveries which bring the reader back in time to players as William Norwood Potter who was chess editor of Land and Water from late 1877 to the close of the column in 1855.
Besides covering various columns I enjoyed reading, research matters on various chess master as, the story from Isidor Gunsberg, Harding:In the late 1880s and 1890 Gunsberg was very active as a professional player, spending long periods out of England, and he gave up his column in the Cheltenham Examiner {and perhaps other titles}because of this. This episode in his life culminated in this unsuccessful world title match against Steinitz. Gunsberg’s lifestyle then underwent a huge change in the summer of 1891 shortly after his return from America.
His first wife, Jane died on 8 May 1891,leaving him with a young family to care for. After this he never played another serious match.
Instead he earned his living by literary work {including a book on chess openings, published in 1895}and by visiting clubs to give lectures and simultaneous displays.
On the rare occasions thereafter when he played a few tournaments, such as Hastings 1895,Gunsberg never recovered his former playing strength.
The first successful chess magazine was The Chess Player’s Chronicle, founded and edited by the legendary Howard Staunton and Tim Harding spends nearly a whole chapter on this
subject.
One short lived magazine of the mid-1870s was The City of London Chess Magazine which began as the house magazine of a club but aimed at a broader audience.
It included games of all kinds, amateur against amateur, amateur against masters, exhibition, correspondence, tournament and classic games.
A major work on Openings was The Synopsis of Chess Openings by William Cook {1850-1917}a Bristol accountant who was also associated with Birmingham Chess Club during his career. Cook was so brilliant to adopt the tabular system of presenting opening variations which had been employed by the German Handbuch ever since its first edition of 1843.
As Harding explains there was a differnce,however;the Germans presented the move sequences horizontally,as Continental works down to the late 20th century Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings have done.Instead Cook used a vertical arrangement which subsequent British authors have used ever since, until databases rendered such works virtually redundant.
We all know Batsford’s Modern Chess Openings but I was not aware that the start of this all began with Chess openings Ancient & Modern which appeared for the first time in 1889 by Freeborough and Ranken.
It was similar to Cook’s Synopsis but with it’s 256 pages it was nearly double the size and much more detailed.
The first four chapters in Harding's book cover chess columns in newspapers and periodicals.Chapters 5 and 6 deals with chess magazines, and Chapter 7 with chess books.
Chapter 8 is completely divided, on doing chess history today. This chapter is overloaded with links addresses and useful tips!
Tim Harding truly helps you here to get started as chess historian
Included are also six appendices, where appendix one British and Irish chess columns to 1914 constitutes over 600 columns a detailed research object, and if you ask me, this is a must have chess book!
Included are Chapter Notes,Bibliography,Index of Games, and a General Index.
Conclusion: A must for every chess historian!


                                                                                                     Chess DVD's


The Popular Italian
by  Viktor Bologan

2018
http://www.chessbase.com
E-Mail info@chessbase.com
Price Euro 29.90
Minimum: Dual Core, 2 GB RAM, Windows 7 or 8.1, DirectX11, graphics card with 256 MB RAM, DVD-ROM drive, Windows Media Player 9, ChessBase 14/Fritz 16 or included Reader and internet access for program activation. Recommended: PC Intel i5 (Quadcore), 4 GB RAM, Windows 10, DirectX11, graphics card with 512 MB RAM or more, 100% DirectX10-compatible sound card, Windows Media Player 11, DVD-ROM drive and internet access for program activation.

The great Grandmaster from Moldova Viktor Bologan presents the user of this DVD with a impressive made 6 hour video files based on the closed and various alternative lines of the Italian game.
So the reader will find theory and game files plus instructive explanations of all kind of moves running after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 and 3…g6,3…Be7 3…d6 etc.
The player of today prefers a modern set-up  with moves as  1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0-0 Nf6 5.d3 0-0 6.a4 d6.
Forty years ago these lines where hardly explored and nowadays they are even more popular than many other lines of the Spanish game!
Several modern 2018 games as Giri – Carlsen Tata Steel play off are presented and that makes it all very up to date!
Would like to end with the following beauty that I found in the extra include additional games: Karjakin,Sergey (2776) - Carlsen,Magnus (2851) [C54]
Paris GCT Blitz Paris (15), 25.06.2017
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0-0 Nf6 5.d3 a6 6.c3 d6 7.a4 Ba7 8.Nbd2 0-0 9.h3 h6 10.Re1 Re8 11.b4 Be6 12.Bxe6 Rxe6 13.Qc2 Ne7 14.Nf1 Ng6 15.c4 a5 16.bxa5 Ne7 17.Rb1 Rb8 18.Bd2 Nc6 19.Ng3 Nd7 20.Rb5 Nc5 21.Reb1 Qc8 22.Be3 Re8 23.Nf5 Ne6 24.Qd2 h5 25.d4 exd4 26.N3xd4 Nexd4 27.Nxd4 Bxd4 28.Bxd4 Rxe4 29.Bc3 Rxc4 30.Rxh5 Qe6 31.Re1 Qg6 32.Rg5 Qxg5 33.Qxg5 Rxc3 34.Re4 Rc5 35.Qg3 Rxa5 36.Rg4 g6 37.Qb3 Kf8 38.Rh4 Ke7 39.Rf4 Nd8 40.Re4+ Kd7 41.Qe3 Nc6 42.Qf3 Rf8 43.Qf6 Re5 44.Rxe5 Nxe5 45.f4 Nc6 46.g4 Nd8 47.h4 Re8 48.h5 gxh5 49.gxh5 Re6 50.Qg7 d5 51.h6 Rg6+ 52.Kf2 Ke7 53.f5 Rf6 54.h7 Rxf5+ 55.Ke1 Ne6 56.Qh6 Re5+ 57.Kd1 Re4 58.h8Q Rxa4 59.Qh2 Kd7 60.Qf6 Kc6 61.Qc2+ Rc4 62.Qxf7 Nc5 63.Qxc4 dxc4 64.Qxc4 b5 65.Qh4 Nb7 66.Qe4+ Kb6 67.Qg6+ Nd6 68.Kc2 Kc5 69.Kb3 Nc4 70.Qg1+ Kc6 71.Kb4 Nd6 72.Qc5+ Kd7 73.Qd5 c6 74.Qg8 Kc7 75.Qg7+ Kb6 76.Qd4+ Kc7 77.Ka5 Nb7+ 78.Ka6 Nd6 79.Qa7+ Kd8 80.Qh7 Nc8 81.Kb7 Ne7 82.Kb6 Kd7 83.Kc5 Ke6 84.Qh6+ Kd7 85.Qd6+ Ke8 86.Qe6 1-0.
Conclusion: This is superb material!


Calculation Training
by  Robert Ris

2018
http://www.chessbase.com
E-Mail info@chessbase.com
Price Euro 29.90
Minimum: Dual Core, 2 GB RAM, Windows 7 or 8.1, DirectX11, graphics card with 256 MB RAM, DVD-ROM drive, Windows Media Player 9, ChessBase 14/Fritz 16 or included Reader and internet access for program activation. Recommended: PC Intel i5 (Quadcore), 4 GB RAM, Windows 10, DirectX11, graphics card with 512 MB RAM or more, 100% DirectX10-compatible sound card, Windows Media Player 11, DVD-ROM drive and internet access for program activation.


Just invest a small five hours of your time and you will understand a lot more about chess and finding winning moves,as we can learn on this DVD it is all a matter of
calculation, and these  techniques can easy be learned!
It all starts with checks and treats and slowly gets more complicated with decision making moves all packed in highly educative made video files.
Included are extra exercises to see if you have understood the lessons of our well explaining teacher from Holland!
Video running time is nearly 5 hours!
Conclusion: This DVD will certainly help you to become a much better player!  


A lifetime repertoire: Play the Nimzo Indian
by  Rustam Kasimdzhanov

2018
http://www.chessbase.com
E-Mail info@chessbase.com
Price Euro 29.90
Minimum: Dual Core, 2 GB RAM, Windows 7 or 8.1, DirectX11, graphics card with 256 MB RAM, DVD-ROM drive, Windows Media Player 9, ChessBase 14/Fritz 16 or included Reader and internet access for program activation. Recommended: PC Intel i5 (Quadcore), 4 GB RAM, Windows 10, DirectX11, graphics card with 512 MB RAM or more, 100% DirectX10-compatible sound card, Windows Media Player 11, DVD-ROM drive and internet access for program activation.



The great master of attack the famous Rustam Kasimdzhanov leads in a impressive over 6 hours and 47 minutes video time throw the massive lines of the fascinating Nimzo- Indian
defence, with lines as: 4.e3 c5 – followed by …b6 to reach a set-up with Bb4-a5 – One of the main lines
4.Qc2 – with 4…0-0 as main line for black – 4.Nf3 b6 – with the idea to play Bb7 and to exchange on c3
4.f3 d5 – the Classical Main Line for Black (instead of the popular …c5)
4.Bg5 c5 5.d5 h6 – with the idea to play Nbd7-b6, a system which offers black new and promising possibilities
Sidelines such as 4.g3, 4.a3, 4.Bd2 and others
Our former FIDE World Champion does not only explains the secrets and strategies of this flexible defence but also provides the user with novelties and extensive game analyses!
This all is well packed in highly instructive video files plus a heavy loaded data base file!
This all comes in,if you wish with two heavy loaded download files!
And I had it in no time on my computer!
Instructive is:Spassky,Boris Vasilievich - Fischer,Robert James [E41]
World-ch27 Fischer-Spassky +7-3=11 Reykjavik (5), 20.07.1972
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Nf3 c5 5.e3 Nc6 6.Bd3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 d6 8.e4 e5 9.d5 Ne7 10.Nh4 h6 11.f4 Ng6 12.Nxg6 fxg6 13.fxe5 dxe5 14.Be3 b6 15.0-0 0-0 16.a4 a5 17.Rb1 Bd7 18.Rb2 Rb8 19.Rbf2 Qe7 20.Bc2 g5 21.Bd2 Qe8 22.Be1 Qg6 23.Qd3 Nh5 24.Rxf8+ Rxf8 25.Rxf8+ Kxf8 26.Bd1 Nf4 27.Qc2 Bxa4 0-1,27.Qc2 was a terrible blunder that loses at once.
With  27.Qb1 he could still struggle on in an inferior position.Brilliant choice of opening!
As we can learn from our famous teacher there is a lot of theory on the Nimzo-Indian but with the selected lines and instructive explanations it is a easy to learn opening.
Conclusion: Extraordinarily well made!


The Amazing Albin Counter-Gambit
by  Lawrence Trent
2018
http://www.chessbase.com
E-Mail info@chessbase.com
Price Euro 29.90
Minimum: Dual Core, 2 GB RAM, Windows 7 or 8.1, DirectX11, graphics card with 256 MB RAM, DVD-ROM drive, Windows Media Player 9, ChessBase 14/Fritz 16 or included Reader and internet access for program activation. Recommended: PC Intel i5 (Quadcore), 4 GB RAM, Windows 10, DirectX11, graphics card with 512 MB RAM or more, 100% DirectX10-compatible sound card, Windows Media Player 11, DVD-ROM drive and internet access for program activation.



The Albin Counter-Gambit (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5!?) is a respectable opening and named after the Austrian master Adolf Albin,who practised this opening successfully in the late ninetieth century.
As we can learn from Lawrence Trent 3.dxe5 d4 gives black dangerous play and was no body else than Grandmaster Alexander Morozevich who showed the chess world the hidden possibilities of this opening.
Again the material is provided in to heavy down loads files and we see a impressive  video running time from over five hours!
Material is divided in Chapter 1:Sidelines ,Chapter 2:5.g3,Chapter 3:5.Nbd2 Chapter 4:5.a3 plus quizzes.
Included is an extra database from over 60 entries!
A fine example of play is: Topalov,Veselin (2757) - Morozevich,Alexander (2741) [D08]
Amber-rapid 14th Monte Carlo (7), 26.03.2005
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 d4 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.a3 Nge7 6.b4 Ng6 7.Bb2 a5 8.b5 Ncxe5 9.Nxe5 Nxe5 10.e3 Be6 11.Bxd4 Nxc4 12.Qc2 Nd6 13.Bd3 Qg5 14.f4 Qh4+ 15.g3 Qh5 16.Nc3 Nf5 17.0-0 0-0-0 18.Ba7 Qg4 19.Ne4 Rd7 20.Rfd1 Qf3 21.Ng5 Nxe3 22.Nxf3 Nxc2 23.Bxc2 b6 24.Ne5 Rxd1+ 25.Rxd1 Bxa3 26.f5 Ba2 27.Ra1 Bc5+ 28.Kf1 Re8 29.Re1 f6 30.Nd3 Rxe1+ 31.Kxe1 Bd6 32.Nc1 Bd5 33.Bb3 Be4 34.Bxb6 cxb6 35.Be6+ Kc7 36.Ke2 Be5 37.Nd3 Kd6 38.Ke3 Bd5 0-1
Conclusion:This DVD offers the user a lot of value for it’s money!  


ChessBase Magazine issue 183
2018
April/May 2018
http://www.chessbase.com
E-Mail info@chessbase.com
ISSN 1432-8992
Price Euro 19.95

System requirements
Minimum: Dual Core, 2 GB RAM, Windows 7 or 8.1, DirectX11, graphics card with 256 MB RAM, DVD-ROM drive, Windows Media Player 9, ChessBase 14/Fritz 16 or included Reader and internet access for program activation. Recommended: PC Intel i5 (Quadcore), 4 GB RAM, Windows 10, DirectX11, graphics card with 512 MB RAM or more, 100% DirectX10-compatible sound card, Windows Media Player 11, DVD-ROM drive and internet access for program activation.



The tournament file on this heavy loaded ChessBase file is good for 668 entries, Gibraltar 1337 entries and Wijk aan Zee 185 entries and that is included with the two tiebreak games between Giri and Carlsen and dear reader the annotated games are again from a very high quality!As for example: Carlsen,Magnus (2834) - Jones,Gawain C B (2640) [B76]
Tata Steel-A 80th Wijk aan Zee (8), 06.02.2018
[Nielsen,PH]
1.e4 Golubev,M 1...c5 A slight surprise as recently Jones have preferred the indeed more solid 1...e5. But as these days publicity is what matters even Nakamura played the Dragon in order just to get in one funny tweet, why wouldn't Jones use his opportunity at the stage vs. the World Champion to advertise his two books on the subject?
2.Nf3 d6 3.d4!? Somewhat impratical, as one could argue Magnus would be an even bigger favourite if a theoretical battle was out of the picture with any random move like 3.¥b5+, but again, that would indeed be predictable. 3...cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 Nc6 8.Qd2 0-0 9.0-0-0 A few years back when Magnus himself played the Dragon as Black 9.¥c4 was the line he was most tested in, but Leko did play this move agianst him in their match at Miskolic 2008. 9...d5 10.Qe1!? This is the pet-line that Leko used to cause get opening advantages yet no wins against Magnus in the match, but later both did collect the full point against Lawrence Trent at Isle of Mans. 10...e5 On my own repertoire DVD I recommended 10...e6 for Black, but since then White has found improvements and in his book Jones rightfully preferred 10...e5.
11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.exd5 Nxd5 Magnus took with the c-pawn - 12...cxd5 - but after 13.¥g5 ¥e6 14.¥c4 it has now been established that Black just suffers, which the games illustrated well.
13.Bc4 Be6 14.Kb1!? Especially two games by Wei Yi in 2013 made this particular move popular as Black just seemed to suffer. In his book Jones recommends 14...¦b8 which even was played shortly after this game in Gibraltar against Duda. Gawain however cunningly deviates from his own recommendation, obviously taking the World Champion by surprise, as he now started spending considerable amounts of times for his next moves: 14...Re8!? 15.Ne4 f5! A strong novelty. 16.Ng5 Bc8! This is the point. Surprisingly there is no way White can really exploit Black's loss of time.
From a practical point of view its tempting for White to try and find a move that might push Black out of his preparations and force "man vs. man" situations, and after a few minutes Magnus lashed out with:
17.g4?? This is logical, as after 17...h6 18.¤e4 why wouldn't it be better that White immediately threatened to open the gfile? However 17.h4 was not only an aggressive move, it also had the advantage of protecting the knight at g5, which means that after... [The computer indicates the logical 17.h4 but concluding that after 17...Rb8!? willingly sacrificing the a7-pawn, Black has sufficient counterplay: 18.Bb3 h6 19.c4 hxg5 20.cxd5 Rxb3! being a principled line.;
One more idea is 17.Bb3!? Golubev,M 17...f4 18.h4 (Black should be able to survive also 18.Ne4 fxe3 19.c4 Be6! 20.cxd5 cxd5 21.Qxe3=) 18...fxe3 19.c4 e4!? 20.cxd5 Qf6 and White has an easy draw, for example, 21.dxc6+ Kh8 22.Nf7+ Kg8 23.Ng5+ (where Black should avoid 23...Be6? 24.Bxe6+ Rxe6 25.Qb4!+- ) but probably no more. Hopefully, Black is OK everywhere. But before entering all these lines in a practical game, the safest is to check them with AlphaZero. One way or another, one can see how dangerous is to play the Dragon these days, if your opponent isn't a lazy world champ but someone who is well prepared.] 17...f4! ...the shocking reality is that Black is winning a piece! Magnus in an interview afterwards admitting to that simply having blundered. 18.h4!? After all Fischer had a point. It's all about h4-h5 and mate against the Dragon! [Else a possible explanation could be invented that 18.Bxf4 exf4 19.Rxd5 cxd5! (but not 19...Rxe1+ 20.Rd1+!) 20.Bxd5+ Qxd5 21.Qxe8+ Bf8 is sufficient as Black's queen covers the f7-square thus leaving White with no effective follow up.
Even more interesting, online spectators where speculating that Magnus was inspired by the sensational attacking games of Alphazero where material considerations seemed to be less important to artificial intelligence that humans so far had seemed to appreciate. Still right now that's a stretch, Black is just a piece up and resignation would in principle be a viable option for White, but as the World Champion stated in the post game interview that the psychological situation had completely changed. White has indeed lost a piece, but also any kind of expectations for a result, while for Jones obviously the reverse must have been true. All pressure is now on the Englishman:] 18...fxe3 19.Qxe3 h6 20.Qc5 Bb7! Objectively the strongest move, [but 20...hxg5 was worth considering. White gets back one piece with some interest after 21.Qxc6 Be6 22.Bxd5 Bxd5 23.Rxd5 but 23...Qb6 24.Qc4 Qe6! while being less advantages based on engine-evalution still should be plenty to win the game as after 25.hxg5 e4 the black Dragon bishop comes to life and after all, is an extra piece!] 21.Ne4 Re6 22.h5 Qb6? Somewhat understandably Gawain wants ot exchange queens, and simultaneously puts it on a logical square eying the b-pawn in the open b-line. [However 22...g5! would effectively shut down White's counterplay on the kingside, and while it does weaken the f5-square and the white squares in general, its not nearly enough for a piece.] Now however: 23.g5! Norwegian Grandmaster Johan Salomon got it spot on here, while tweeting that things has turned 180 degrees predicting a white win, while the engines indeed still shows Black is safely winning. Black is still a piece up, but he has gone from having the kingside under control, to now entering chaos. 23...hxg5? [The primary problem of course is that 23...Qxc5 while it does exchange the queens, does lose material immediately after 24.Nxc5 as 24...Re7 25.Nxb7 Rxb7 26.Rxd5! wins.;
23...Bf8! would have prevented White's next move, and while 24.Qg1! Qxg1 25.Rdxg1 still is a decent initiative for White, the lack of queens does make a noticeable difference.] 24.Qa3 Rb8 25.b3! A great move. Sure it blocks White's queen from the 3rd rank, but it can be regrouped via c1 if neccesary, and mainly now it's all about king safety: Black's will be exposed, while White now having removed the weakness of b2, to the safely defended b3, will not have to bother in the sligthest about a black counterattack in the process. Stockfish despite being a piece down already gives 0.00 indicating equality, but I'm sure, were Alphazero not busy with new important research projects, it would tell us White already is winning as his long-term initiative is unstoppable. 25...Qd8 Technically the losing move. 25...gxh5 or 25...g4 was a better chance. 26.Qxa7! It's not so much the pawn, but more the attack along the 7th rank that matters, as well as again the queen could go to g1 attacking along the g-file if need be. 26...gxh5 27.Rxh5 Rg6 28.Rxg5 Rxg5 29.Nxg5 Exploiting that the rook on b8 is unprotected should Black take the knight on g5. 29...Qc8 30.Rg1 Ra8 31.Qb6 Ra6 32.Qc5 Qd7 33.Ne4 Kh8 34.Qf2 Qe7 35.Bxa6 Direct attack also would have decided the game, but almost with a touch of irony, Magnus gets materialistic in the end. 35...Bxa6 36.Qh2+ Kg8 37.Qh6 Qa7 38.Qe6+ Kf8 39.Rg5 Ne3 40.Qd6+ Kf7 41.Nc5 Bc8 42.Rxg7+ As 42...¢xg7 43.£xe5+ followed by 44.£xe3 leaves White a healthy 3 pawns up, Black resigned. 1-0.
Other contributions are Opening video from Daniel King:Chigorin Defence,Mihail Marin:Reti/Catalan and Jonas Lampert:French Fort Knox.
Williams:Move by Move where Simon Williams put the Queen’s Indian game Gupta – Ivanchuk on his training plan.Rogozenko: The Classic,Grivas:Fide training course.Marin:Strategy.Reeh:Tactics.Müller:Endgames between Gibraltar and Wijk aan Zee.
Knaak :Recent Opening traps and a smashing collection opening surveys as:
Quintiliano: Nimzowitsch Larsen Opening A01 (Recommendation for Black)
1.b3 e5 2.Bb2 Nc6 3.e3 Nf6,Kuzmin: London System A45 (Recommendation for White)
1.d4 Nf6 2.Bf4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.e3 Bg7 5.h4,Szabo: Sicilian B41 (Recommendation for White)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.c4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Qc7 7.Be2,Kritz: Sicilian B60 (Recommendation for White)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 Qb6 8.Bxf6 gxf6 9.Nb3,Kosintseva: Sicilian B67 (Recommendation for White)
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 Bd7 9.f3 Be7 10.h4 h6 11.Be3 h5 12.Bg5,Papp: French C06 (Recommendation for White)
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.Bd3 c5 6.c3 Nc6 7.Ne2 cxd4 8.cxd4 f6 9.exf6 Nxf6 10.0-0 Bd6 11.Nf3 Qc7 12.Nc3 a6 13.Re1 0-0 14.h3,Schandorff: Petroff Defence C42 (Recommendation for Black)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Nc6 7.0-0 Bg4,Stohl: Four Knights Game C48 (Recommendation for Black)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bb5 Bd6 ,Postny: Ruy Lopez C78 (Recommendation for White)
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.c3 d6 8.a4 Rb8 9.d4 Bb6 10.a5,Ris: Slav Defence D15 (Recommendation for White)
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 a6 5.Qc2 and Langrock: Catalan E05 (Recommendation for Black)
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 Be7 5.Bg2 0-0 6.0-0 dxc4 7.Ne5 c5.
Included is useful made booklet in two languages!
Conclusion:Incredible material! 



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